All Soul’s Day, 1888

In my previous post, I attempted to clarify the motivations that animate my recent — and hopefully measured — criticism of Bishop Barron. I tried to make it clear that, while I take issue with his claims and arguments, my concern is not only academic in scope. I am more concerned with the effect his now persistent rhetoric against what he calls “wokeness” has upon Catholics of color in the United States, especially Black Catholics. …


Flaming June, by Frederic Lord Leighton (1830–1896)

It is well known that Bishop Barron doesn’t like something he refers to as “wokeness” or “CRT” or a variety of other names that describe the same thing, however unclearly. I believe his admonitions demand concrete examples and better arguments to clarify. I think he ought to submit to scrutiny and dialogue with those who disagree with him to a degree that might discomfort him. But these demands are in many ways routine and not enough. My concerns are not limited to pedantic fact-checking.

Over the years, I have expressed similar concerns and criticism about the influence of other popular…


Timothy Gordon at a Stop the Steal rally in Louisiana.

In early January, I noted that Ali “Alexander” Akbar, a twice-convicted felon and leader of the now-infamous “Stop the Steal” seditious insurrection, was preparing his next move in advance of the sure-to-fail rally on January 6th by announcing his desire to convert to Catholicism. My note on Twitter sparked outrage by conservative Catholics in the USA who called Mr. Akbar a modern-day St. Paul. (They have all now gone totally silent about this.) Amongst the outraged was Timothy Gordon, who himself attended a prior Stop the Steal rally (pictured above) and fomented ideas of civil war, “color revolution,” and other…


Introduction

The Old Man and the Sea is a tale of fishing, the ocean, a marlin, an old man, and a boy written by Ernest Hemingway in 1951. It is known for being a concisely written story. In this essay, I will present my thoughts on The Old Man and the Sea. I will summarize it and then present a commentary where I will go through the book again, chronologically providing reflections from my reading of this book. …


“In this statement, we bishops do not intend to tell Catholics for whom or against whom to vote.”

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship: A Call to Political Responsibility from the Catholic Bishops of the United States (emphasis added)

“A Catholic organization may not directly or indirectly make any statement, in any medium, to endorse, support, or oppose any candidate for public office, political party or PAC.”

Political Activity & Lobbying Guidelines for Catholic Organizations — USCCB Office of General Counsel

Fr. Edward Meeks, Pastor of Christ the King parish in Towson, MD.

On October 11th, Fr. Edward Meeks delivered a 26-minute homily at Christ the King…


“In this statement, we bishops do not intend to tell Catholics for whom or against whom to vote.”

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship: A Call to Political Responsibility from the Catholic Bishops of the United States (emphasis added)

“A Catholic organization may not directly or indirectly make any statement, in any medium, to endorse, support, or oppose any candidate for public office, political party or PAC.”

Political Activity & Lobbying Guidelines for Catholic Organizations — USCCB Office of General Counsel

Fr. Edward Meeks, Pastor of Christ the King parish in Towson, MD.

On October 11th, Fr. Edward Meeks delivered a 26-minute homily at Christ the King…


“In this statement, we bishops do not intend to tell Catholics for whom or against whom to vote.”

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship: A Call to Political Responsibility from the Catholic Bishops of the United States (emphasis added)

“A Catholic organization may not directly or indirectly make any statement, in any medium, to endorse, support, or oppose any candidate for public office, political party or PAC.”

Political Activity & Lobbying Guidelines for Catholic Organizations — USCCB Office of General Counsel

Fr. Edward Meeks, Pastor of Christ the King parish in Towson, MD.

On October 11th, Fr. Edward Meeks delivered a 26-minute homily at Christ the King…


“In this statement, we bishops do not intend to tell Catholics for whom or against whom to vote.”

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship: A Call to Political Responsibility from the Catholic Bishops of the United States (emphasis added)

“A Catholic organization may not directly or indirectly make any statement, in any medium, to endorse, support, or oppose any candidate for public office, political party or PAC.”

Political Activity & Lobbying Guidelines for Catholic Organizations — USCCB Office of General Counsel

Fr. Edward Meeks, Pastor of Christ the King parish in Towson, MD.

On October 11th, Fr. Edward Meeks delivered a 26-minute homily at Christ the King…


From left to right: Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza, Opal Tometi (Source)

Patrisse Cullors and Alicia Garza, along with Opal Tometi, founded the Black Lives Matter Global Network (BLMGN) in 2013 and 2014. BLMGN was born when Garza posted her outrage over the acquittal of George Zimmerman for the murder of Trayvon Martin on social media, using the expression “Black lives matter.” Cullors turned Garza’s expression into the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter. When the hashtag went viral, it gave them a media platform that became BLMGN, commonly referred to as BLM. All three co-founders are Black. (Source.)

At this writing, there is a renewed effort underway to dismiss the slogan “Black Lives Matter.” One…


Iliad, Book VIII, lines 245–53, Greek manuscript, late 5th, early 6th centuries AD.

Introduction

The Iliad, Odyssey, and Aeneid are epic poems. These poems share enough similarities to be considered a trilogy of sorts. Each poem shares a common element: the Trojan War. In the Iliad, there is the fighting of the Trojan War. In the Odyssey, there is a return from the Trojan War. Finally, in the Aeneid, there is an escape from the ruin of the Trojan War. Although they share a common war, each poem also contains multiple parts that differentiate them from each other, which I will be discussing over the course of this essay.

One of these parts…

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